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Supraventricular Tachycardia Ablation and Effects on Anxiety Medications
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  • Justin Haloot,
  • Mohamed Mahmoud,
  • Vanessa Rodriguez Fuenmayor,
  • Mubeen Cheema,
  • Auroa Badin
Justin Haloot
The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio
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Mohamed Mahmoud
The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio
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Vanessa Rodriguez Fuenmayor
The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio
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Mubeen Cheema
The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio
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Auroa Badin
River Side Methodist Hospital
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Abstract

Background: Patients with true paroxysmal supraventricular tachycardia (SVT) are frequently misdiagnosed with panic or anxiety disorders due to similar symptoms of palpitations, light-headedness, dyspnea, or chest discomfort. Unrecognized SVT can lead to unnecessary management with anxiety medications. Treatment of SVT with catheter ablation may lead to reduction in anxiety medications. Methods: A total of 175 patients underwent successful SVT ablation between January 1, 2010 and December 31, 2020. We examined symptoms at presentation, psychiatric medications prior to SVT ablation, comorbidities, and psychiatric medications at 3 months post-ablation. Results: 15% of patients who underwent successful SVT ablation were being treated with psychiatric medications and were included in the final study population. The most common symptoms were palpitations (80.77%), followed by dizziness (42.31%), and shortness of breath (34.62%). The average number of medications prior to ablation was 1.42 and decreased down to 1.08 at 3 months post-ablation (p = 0.04). The average number of SSRIs, SNRIs, and other anxiolytics were also decreased but were not statistically significant. Conclusion: In patients with anxiety and paroxysmal supraventricular tachycardia, catheter ablation is associated with reduced average number of psychiatric medications.